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Results for: 'recessive'

Genetic terms Animation

By: HWC, Views: 195

Diploid organisms have pairs of genes, on pairs of homologous chromosomes. Each gene has a specific location on the chromosome. We call this the gene's locus. In this species, the locus for gene B is always between the loci for genes A and C. Most genes come in two or more slightly differen...

Monohybrid crosses

By: HWC, Views: 4341

A monohybrid cross is a cross between two parents that breed true for different versions of a single trait. In this example, that trait is flower color. The allele that specifies purple flowers is dominant over the allele that specifies white flowers. The purple-flowered plant has two domin...

Mendel's Principles of Dominance, Segregation and Independent Assortment

By: HWC, Views: 6059

Mendel selected true-breeding parents with contrasting traits, for example, purple and white flower color, and performed reciprocal crosses by choosing pollen from one parent and hand pollinating the seed-forming parent with this pollen. A cross-fertilization resulted from this procedure. In t...

Sex-Linked Traits! How are eye colors inherited in fruit flies?

By: HWC, Views: 5646

The eye color gene is located on the X chromosome (one of the sex determining chromosomes of Drosophila). White eye color is recessive. When a red eyed male mates with white eyed females, their daughters will have red eyes, but their sons will have white eyes.

How to find out if a population is evolving?

By: HWC, Views: 3505

Imagine a butterfly population with a pair of alleles that influence wing color as shown. We will represent the frequency of the dominant allele as p and the recessive allele as q. The Hardy-Weinberg rule describes what happens if a population is at genetic equilibrium—if it is not evolving...

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