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Glycolysis Animation

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HWC

In glycolysis, a six-carbon glucose molecule is split into two three-carbon pyruvate molecules. In this animation, each carbon molecule is represented by a red ball. The end products of glycolysis are two molecules of pyruvate. Glycolysis is the breakdown of glucose into two molecules of pyruvate. It begins with an energy input of two ATP molecules. The end products of glycolysis are two molecules of pyruvate. First, enzyme action promotes the transfer of a phosphate group from ATP to glucose to form glucose-6-phosphate. The glucose-6-phosphate molecule rearranges to form fructose-6-phosphate. A second phosphate is transferred from another ATP to form fructose-1,6-bisphosphate. This molecule immediately splits to form two molecules of phosphogluteraldehyde, or PGAL. Each PGAL molecule gives up two electrons and a hydrogen to NAD+ to form NADH. Then, each PGAL combines with inorganic phosphate to form a molecule of 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate. Each molecule of bisphosphoglycerate donates a phosphate group to ADP to form ATP. With this formation of two ATPs, the original ATP debt is paid off. Each of the resulting three phosphoglycerates undergoes a rearrangement, and then releases a proton and one hydroxide ion, which combine to form water. The resulting intermediates, two molecules of phosphoenolpyruvate, or PEP are unstable. Each gives up a phosphate to ADP. The end products of glycolysis are two molecules of pyruvate.

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